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The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) is asking whether it should develop a new contamination control standard that identifies best practices for cleaning firefighters' PPE and how gear should be handled after possible exposure to contaminants, or, instead, add that information to the existing NFPA 1581 standard.

Read entire article - https://community.nfpa.org/community/nfpa-today/blog/2017/10/05/should-nfpa-develop-an-all-new-standard-on-ppe-contaminant-control-or-roll-the-requirements-into-nfpa-1581

 

There’s no mistaking the value in lifelong learning, but training courses – whether they last a few hours or a few days, can sometimes seem daunting to anyone enrolled in them.

A 2015 Microsoft study found that the average person’s attention span is about 8 seconds. While that finding and others like it might suggest that any productivity or safety message at work is playing to a sold-out crowd at Short Attention Span Theatre, a new trend known as microlearning seeks to capitalize on that apparent shortcoming.

As the name suggests, microlearning courses are shorter than traditional training: A single microlearning session aims to teach one particular lesson in a concentrated way – a single presentation typically ranges from 2 to 5 minutes. Such sessions are typically more convenient than traditional classroom settings, too: Most microlearning formats are easily accessed from smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers, while organizations can choose to offer courses either at specific times or an on-demand basis.

Considering the time many people spend watching video – one recent study found that many Millennials spend upwards of a total of three hours a day gazing into the electronic ether – the concept of brief, targeted lessons with clear-cut goals seems like a logical progression in eLearning.

In the few years since such courses have been offered, there is evidence to suggest that putting forth the effort can bear fruit. As chronicled in the 2016 Fortune magazine article "Corporate Training Gets an Upgrade for the Facebook Generation," Walmart developed an app for its warehouse workers comprised of three-minute instructional videos on performing common tasks safely. Each lesson was followed by a short test. Following a trial period of six-months, injury claims at the company’s warehouses fell by nearly half. The magazine also looked at a private Facebook group created by PayPal aimed at helping its employees help each other troubleshoot by watching videos of short classes. One major takeaway was that the number of workers who finished at least two training courses every six months doubled. During that same period, PayPal was able to reduce its training expenses by nearly a 25 percent.

It’s clear that such a method – taken by itself – has its limits. For example, a two-day personal protective equipment training course cannot adequately impart all its lessons in a single five-minute video, no matter how motivated the student and concise the course material. And instructor-led courses have the versatility of responding to students’ learning pace and questions in an organic way. However, when microlearning sessions are incorporated in the framework of a longer course in complementary ways, such as when some lessons are transferred to video as prerequisites for attending a brick-and-mortar course or when they are used in conjunction with one to introduce or reinforce concepts, it appears that the sky (or the Cloud) is the limit.

NIOSH announced recently that it is launching a Center for Occupational Robotics Research to assess potential benefits and risks of robot workers and develop guidance for safe interactions between humans and robots.

According to NIOSH, the decision to create the new center to assess the benefits and risks and to develop guidance for safe interactions between people and robots was based on the fact that while increasing numbers of robots enter the 21st century workplace, the benefits and potential risks of robots in the workplace are not fully known.

Read entire article - https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/robotics/default.html

 

Tagged in: NIOSH

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Heads up – a final rule from OSHA on updating general industry walking-working surfaces and protection standards has been in effect since Mid-January, though the effective dates for several provisions are being spread out over a period that extends all the way to November 2036.

The final rule includes revised and new provisions addressing, for example, fixed ladders; rope descent systems; fall protection systems and criteria, including personal fall protection systems; and training on fall hazards and fall protection systems. In addition, the final rule adds requirements on the design, performance, and use of personal fall protection systems.

Most of the rule became effective January 17, 2017, 60 days after it was published in the Federal Register, but some provisions delayed effective dates, including:
-Ensuring exposed workers are trained on fall hazards (May 17, 2017),
-Ensuring workers who use equipment covered by the final rule are trained (May 17, 2017),
-Inspecting and certifying permanent anchorages for rope descent systems (November 20, 2017),
According to OSHA’s website, the final two protection factors that must be completed by November 2018 are to:
-Install personal fall arrest or ladder safety systems on new fixed ladders over 24 feet and on replacement ladders/ladder sections, including fixed ladders on outdoor advertising structures (by Nov. 19, 2018).
-Ensure existing fixed ladders over 24 feet, including those on outdoor advertising structures, are fitted with a cage, well, personal fall arrest system, or ladder safety system (by Nov. 19, 2018).

Nearly a full 18 years later (November 18, 2036, to be exact), cages and wells (used as fall protection) must be replaced with ladder safety or personal fall arrest systems on all fixed ladders over 24 feet.

Even if your workplace doesn’t take personnel to such heights, there’s plenty of reason to pay attention to potential slip and fall hazards.

OSHA lists falling as one of the most common causes of workplace fatalities. The risks are even greater when a fall occurs to a lower level, which the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has identified as the most deadly type of fall on the job.

Workplace Safety & Health Co. stands ready to help workplaces be safe places to tread. We offer courses in Fall Protection and a wide range of other training topics, from OSHA Recordkeeping and Lockout/Tagout, to First Aid /CPR and Excavation Safety (and quite a few in between). Contact us for more information on how we can help your organization stay on a good footing.

Tagged in: fall protection OSHA

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announced recent the availability of a new software platform to track and monitor emergency response and recovery worker activities during all phases of emergency response following a natural disaster or other public health emergency.

The software, ERHMS Info Manager™, is a custom-built product developed by NIOSH for emergency responder organizations to use to implement the Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance (ERHMS™) framework.

Read entire article - https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/erhms/erhms-info-manager.html?s_cid=3ni7d2-pr-erhmsim-09052017

Tagged in: NIOSH

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