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The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) is asking whether it should develop a new contamination control standard that identifies best practices for cleaning firefighters' PPE and how gear should be handled after possible exposure to contaminants, or, instead, add that information to the existing NFPA 1581 standard.

Read entire article - https://community.nfpa.org/community/nfpa-today/blog/2017/10/05/should-nfpa-develop-an-all-new-standard-on-ppe-contaminant-control-or-roll-the-requirements-into-nfpa-1581

 

NIOSH announced recently that it is launching a Center for Occupational Robotics Research to assess potential benefits and risks of robot workers and develop guidance for safe interactions between humans and robots.

According to NIOSH, the decision to create the new center to assess the benefits and risks and to develop guidance for safe interactions between people and robots was based on the fact that while increasing numbers of robots enter the 21st century workplace, the benefits and potential risks of robots in the workplace are not fully known.

Read entire article - https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/robotics/default.html

 

Tagged in: NIOSH

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Heads up – a final rule from OSHA on updating general industry walking-working surfaces and protection standards has been in effect since Mid-January, though the effective dates for several provisions are being spread out over a period that extends all the way to November 2036.

The final rule includes revised and new provisions addressing, for example, fixed ladders; rope descent systems; fall protection systems and criteria, including personal fall protection systems; and training on fall hazards and fall protection systems. In addition, the final rule adds requirements on the design, performance, and use of personal fall protection systems.

Most of the rule became effective January 17, 2017, 60 days after it was published in the Federal Register, but some provisions delayed effective dates, including:
-Ensuring exposed workers are trained on fall hazards (May 17, 2017),
-Ensuring workers who use equipment covered by the final rule are trained (May 17, 2017),
-Inspecting and certifying permanent anchorages for rope descent systems (November 20, 2017),
According to OSHA’s website, the final two protection factors that must be completed by November 2018 are to:
-Install personal fall arrest or ladder safety systems on new fixed ladders over 24 feet and on replacement ladders/ladder sections, including fixed ladders on outdoor advertising structures (by Nov. 19, 2018).
-Ensure existing fixed ladders over 24 feet, including those on outdoor advertising structures, are fitted with a cage, well, personal fall arrest system, or ladder safety system (by Nov. 19, 2018).

Nearly a full 18 years later (November 18, 2036, to be exact), cages and wells (used as fall protection) must be replaced with ladder safety or personal fall arrest systems on all fixed ladders over 24 feet.

Even if your workplace doesn’t take personnel to such heights, there’s plenty of reason to pay attention to potential slip and fall hazards.

OSHA lists falling as one of the most common causes of workplace fatalities. The risks are even greater when a fall occurs to a lower level, which the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has identified as the most deadly type of fall on the job.

Workplace Safety & Health Co. stands ready to help workplaces be safe places to tread. We offer courses in Fall Protection and a wide range of other training topics, from OSHA Recordkeeping and Lockout/Tagout, to First Aid /CPR and Excavation Safety (and quite a few in between). Contact us for more information on how we can help your organization stay on a good footing.

Tagged in: fall protection OSHA

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) announced recent the availability of a new software platform to track and monitor emergency response and recovery worker activities during all phases of emergency response following a natural disaster or other public health emergency.

The software, ERHMS Info Manager™, is a custom-built product developed by NIOSH for emergency responder organizations to use to implement the Emergency Responder Health Monitoring and Surveillance (ERHMS™) framework.

Read entire article - https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/erhms/erhms-info-manager.html?s_cid=3ni7d2-pr-erhmsim-09052017

Tagged in: NIOSH

Sometimes downward trends are a good thing. When they reflect a decrease in injuries, there’s little room for argument.

According to estimates released recently by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, private industry employers reported approximately 2.9 million nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses. That’s nearly 48,500 fewer nonfatal injury and illness cases than the year before. Specifically, the 2016 rate of total recordable cases (TRC) fell 0.1 cases per 100 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers, adding to a pattern of declines that, with the exception of 2012, has continued since 2004.

Those numbers were based on the bureau’s annual Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

Four private industry sectors—construction, manufacturing, wholesale trade, and retail trade—showed what the BLS said were statistically significant reductions in the TRC rate of occupational injuries and illnesses in 2016.

Of those four sectors, only retail trade (at 122,390) and manufacturing (at 118,050) showed more than 100,000 days away from work (DAFW) cases. Of these two sectors, only manufacturing had a decrease in both the count and incidence rate for DAFW cases last year.

In all, the BLS reported there were 892,270 occupational injuries and illnesses in 2016 that led to days away from work in private industry, a slight change from the number reported for 2015. The overall private industry incidence rate for DAFW cases was 91.7 per 10,000 FTE workers in 2016. The median number of days away from work — a measure of the severity of such cases — was 8 in 2016, unchanged from 2015.

Finance and insurance was the only sector where the TRC rate of injuries and illnesses increased in 2016. However, the relatively low number of cases reported there yielded the lowest rate among all private industry sectors at 0.6 cases per 100 FTE workers.

Meanwhile, the TRC rate of work-related injuries and illnesses was unchanged among 14 other private industry sectors in 2016.

In manufacturing:
-19 percent (22,040) of the DAFW cases were the result of falls, slips, or trips in 2016, a drop of 1,470 cases from 2015 levels.
-Sprains, strains, or tears accounted for 30 percent (35,110) of the DAFW cases – a decrease of 2,480 cases from 2015. These cases occurred at a rate of 28.2 cases per 10,000 FTE workers in 2016, down from 30.3 cases in 2015.
-Cuts, lacerations, or punctures accounted for 13 percent (14,960) of the DAFW cases in manufacturing, a decrease of 720 cases from 2015.

Some of the other standouts from the 2016 survey:
-The rate of other recordable cases (ORC) declined by 0.1 cases, while rates for the case types days away restricted transferred (DART), days away from work (DAFW) and days of job transfer or restriction only (DJTR) — were unchanged from 2015. In fact, the rate of DJTR cases has stayed at 0.7 cases per 100 FTE workers since 2011.
-Nearly a third of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses were of a more serious nature and led to days away from work.
-Injuries and illnesses to production workers accounted for 64 percent (75,070 cases) of total DAFW cases in manufacturing in 2016, a decrease of 3,510 cases from 2015.
-Transportation and material moving workers’ injuries and illnesses accounted for 18 percent (21,100 cases) of the total DAFW cases in manufacturing – a decrease of 950 cases from 2015. This equated to an incidence rate of 17.7 cases per 10,000 FTE workers in 2016, down from a rate of 19.0 such cases in 2015.
-Other leading events or exposures in manufacturing in 2016 were contact with object or equipment (with 35.4 cases per 10,000 FTE workers) and overexertion and bodily reaction (with 34.1 cases). Both rates were essentially unchanged from 2015, however.

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