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OSHA’s annual preliminary list of top 10 most-cited safety violations – what National Safety Council President and CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman has called “a roadmap that identifies the hazards you want to avoid on the journey to safety excellence” – saw little change this year compared to last year’s.

The list was released Sept. 29 at the National Safety Council‘s 2015 Congress & Expo by Patrick Kapust, deputy director of OSHA’s Directorate of Enforcement Programs.

And here it is (the applicable OSHA standard appears in parentheses):
1. Fall Protection in Construction (1926.501) – 6,721
2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 5,192
3. Scaffolding in Construction (1926.451) – 4,295
4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 3,305
5. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 3,002
6. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 2,760
7. Ladders in Construction (1926.1053) – 2,489
8. Electrical – Wiring Methods (1910.305) – 2,404
9. Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 2,295
10. Electrical – General Requirements (1910.303) – 1,973

The figures are for FY 2015, which ran from Oct. 1, 2014 through Sept. 8, 2015. The figures were to be updated after the end of the fiscal year on Sept. 30, 2015.

In terms of ranking, only the categories of Electrical Wiring Methods and Ladders exchanged places in FY 2015.
The No. 2 violation continues to be a strong second, however. While the number of hazard communication violations issued by OSHA did not see a large increase from FY 2014 to FY 2015, its ranking on the list should still serve employers as an indicator of the importance of ensuring chemical hazard training is up to date with the agency’s adoption into its existing chemical standard.

Under GHS, chemical labels contain a signal word, pictogram and hazard statement for each hazard class and category.

There are nine standardized pictograms that must be surrounded by a red border. Precautionary statements may also be included.

SDSs now have a 16-section format, with sections that include identification of the chemical, first-aid steps for exposure and disposal considerations.

As of June 1, 2015, all new chemical labels and safety data sheets (SDSs) are required to conform to GHS. However, it is possible that some of the old-style labels and SDSs will persist for some time. Under the new system, distributors may still ship products with the previous set of labels until Dec. 1, 2015.

At Workplace Safety, we stand ready to help businesses build safety into their work practices with training programs in areas including HAZMAT/HAZWOPER, lockout/tagout, confined space entry and rescue, first aid/CPR (to including AED and Bloodborne Pathogens), asbestos operations and maintenance, excavation safety and fall protection.

Tagged in: OSHA

OSHA has issued policies and procedures for applying a new process for resolving whistleblower dispute according to an announcement on its website. The process is part of an early resolution process that is part of a regional Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) program.

The program gives whistleblower parties the change to negotiate a settlement with the assistance of a neutral, confidential OSHA rep with expertise in whistleblower investigations. The ADR Act requires that each federal agency "adopt a policy that addresses the use of alternative means of dispute resolution and case management."

"OSHA receives several thousand whistleblower complaints for investigation each year," Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels said in a statement. "The Alternative Dispute Resolution process can be a valuable alternative to the expensive and time consuming process of an investigation and litigation. It will provide whistleblower complainants and respondents the option of exploring voluntary resolution of their disputes outside of the traditional investigative process."

Read entire - https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=NEWS_RELEASES&p_id=28596

Tagged in: OSHA whistlerblower

The final deadline by which OSHA expects U.S. employers to fully comply with its 2012 final rule revising the Hazard Communication Standard is less than eight months away – and the clock is ticking.

By June 1, 2016, employers should have their workplace labeling procedures in place and their employees trained on what the agency has termed the "right to understand" standard, differentiating it from the previous "right to know" regulation.

A May 2015 memorandum to OSHA regional administrators from the Director of OSHA's Directorate of Enforcement Programs, Thomas Galassi, was issued three days before the most recent deadline, June 1, 2015 for manufacturers to be producing safety data sheets and labels in format that complies with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS). In that document, Galassi indicated many chemical suppliers would likely miss that June 1 deadline, referring to a memorandum in February that said OSHA inspectors should take into account good-faith efforts by chemical manufacturers, importers, and distributors trying to comply with the revised standard but having not received classification and safety data sheet information from suppliers upstream.

"Since issuing the guidance on February 9, 2015, OSHA has received an overwhelming number of additional questions and requests for further clarification on behalf of manufacturers, importers, and distributors. Many of the questions relate to the use of HCS 1994-compliant labels on containers packaged for shipment (i.e., existing stock)," the memo stated.

According to the revised standard, manufacturers and importers must classify the hazards of chemicals they produce or import, and distributors must transmit the required information to employers. Employers, in turn, must provide information to their employees about any hazardous chemicals to which they are exposed, using a hazard communication program, labels and other forms of warning, safety data sheets, and information and training.

The revised standard allows distributors to continue shipping chemicals with labels that meet the old standard, though only until Dec. 1 of this year.

According to the final rule, employers are to ensure that each container of a hazardous chemical is labeled with a product identifier, signal word, hazard statement(s), pictogram(s) and precautionary statement(s). However, that does not apply to portable containers into which hazardous chemicals are being transferred from labeled containers and that are intended only for immediate use by the employee conducting the transfer.

In addition, the final rule states that employers "may use signs, placards, process sheets, batch tickets, operating procedures, or other such written materials in lieu of affixing labels to individual stationary process containers, as long as the alternative method identifies the containers to which it is applicable and conveys the information required . . . to be on a label."

Fortunately, OSHA has provided a great deal of information about the new standard on its website (https://www.osha.gov/dep/enforcement/hcs_guide_052015.html); examples include a "Steps to an Effective Hazard Communication Program for Employers That Use Hazardous Chemicals" fact sheet, a side-by-side comparison of the previous and new standards and the memos issued by Galassi.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recently extended the transition period for the respirator certification standard by means of a new final rule. The standards initially established in the 2012 final rule were originally designed to take effect over a three-year transition period, during which manufacturers were allowed to continue to manufacture, label, and sell respirators certified to the prior standards. The new rule allows NIOSH to extend the concluding date until one year after the agency approves a Closed-Circuit Escape Respirator (CCER) model.

Read entire article - https://www.aiha.org/publications-and-resources/TheSynergist/Industry%20News/Pages/NIOSH-Extends-Transition-Period-for-Respirator-Certification-Standard.aspx

Tagged in: NIOSH

Preliminary data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries showed fatal work injuries increased by 2 percent in 2014 from the prior year, although the rate of 3.3 per 100,000 full-time workers stayed the same.

The preliminary total in 2014 was 4,679 fatal work injuries.

"Far too many people are still killed on the job – 13 workers every day taken from their families tragically and unnecessarily. These numbers underscore the urgent need for employers to provide a safe workplace for their employees as the law requires," U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez said in a statement.

Fatal falls, slips, and trips rose by 10 percent in 2014 from the previous year. Falls to lower level were up 9 percent to 647 from 595 in 2013, while falls on the same level increased 17 percent, according to BLS. And fatal work injuries due to transportation incidents rose slightly to 1,891 from 1,865 in 2013, with transportation incidents accounting for 40 percent of fatal workplace injuries in 2014.

Fatal work injuries due to violence and other injuries by persons or animals were lower in 2014, with 749 deaths in 2014 compared to 773 in 2013.

 

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