Workplace Safety & Health Co. Inc. Blog

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.
  • Bloggers
    Bloggers Search for your favorite blogger from this site.
  • Team Blogs
    Team Blogs Find your favorite team blogs here.
  • Login
    Login Login form

Posted by on in Uncategorized
Driving to...Distractions

When we think of safety at work, it’s important to consider that for many employees on their way to, from, or for work, safety centers around staying focused on driving. Yet distracted driving remains one of the leading causes of transportation-related accidents.

According to statistics compiled by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), in 2012, 3,328 people in the United States were killed in crashes involving a distracted driver, compared to 3,360 in 2011. Another 421,000 people were injured in motor vehicle crashes involving a distracted driver in 2012, a 9 percent increase from the 387,000 people injured in 2011.

Each April, the National Safety Council – a nonprofit organization chartered by Congress – promotes Distracted Driving Awareness Month and encourages motorists to drive cell phone free. The NSC maintains that one concern contributing is the amount of communication devices built into some of today’s vehicles as well as those brought along for the ride. It isn’t the devices that are the problem, the NSC says: It’s the state of mental distraction to which they can contribute.

Distracted driving can come in a variety of forms and arise from a variety of causes, from eating or drinking to adjusting a radio or media player to reaching for an object. But perhaps the distraction most closely linked with the use of technology is the use of cell phones, particularly to send and receive text messages.

A popular notion is that cell phone improves productivity at work by cutting down on the “down time” experienced on the road. Yet, a 2009 survey of NSC members showed that 99 percent of companies with policies that prohibit the use of cell phones and messaging devices while driving saw no decreases in productivity – with some experiencing an increase in productivity – after the policies took effect.

Curiously, according to another poll conducted by the NSC, 53 percent of respondents indicated they believe hands-free devices must be safe to use if they are built into cars and trucks. The poll also found that 80 percent of respondents believe hands-free cell phones are safer to use while driving than hand-held models. Also, of the respondents who indicated that they using hands-free devices while driving, 70 percent indicated they do so for safety reasons.

The NSC recommends that companies ban all types of cell phone use while driving, including texting, hand-held conversations and hands-free conversations. All-out bans concerning cell phones continue to be a thorny subject, however. Something that might help to sell the concept to the private sector ahead of government is the issue of liability. For example, when an employee is injured off-site while using a cell phone for company business, does the incident trigger workers’ compensation coverage? If so, it will likely raise workers’ compensation rates – and insurance companies will likely offer strong defenses against such claims.

It’s all something to think about – just maybe not while driving.

 

Tagged in: Distracted driving NSC

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in partnership with the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA), has presented two companies with the 2015 Safe-in-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Awards™ – a way to recognize organizations that have shown dedication to the prevention of noise-induced hearing loss through excellent hearing loss prevention practices in the workplace.

Read entire article: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/updates/upd-02-19-15.html

A new, 24-page downloadable booklet from NIOSH employs illustrations to show how and where employees in a retail setting could use mechanical assist devices to lift, push, or pull heavy materials.

According to NIOSH, manual material handling injuries, or overexertion injuries, account for 60 percent of the injuries and lost work in some types of retail business.

The booklet was inspired by a NIOSH/CalOSHA booklet, Ergonomic Guidelines for Manual Material Handling (2007-131), NIOSH stated. The new document was published in response to a recognized need by members of the NORA Wholesale and Retail Trade Sector for informational materials showing interventions in work settings that were familiar to employers and employees.

Read entire article: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2015-100/

Top 10 lists can be entertaining, but they can also be eye-opening and informative. Take, for example, the 10 leading causes of workplace injuries in the United States.

The 2014 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index shows that the 10 most disabling injuries added up to $59.58 billion a year in direct workers’ compensation costs. That equates to well over $1 billion per week.

The index, compiled by the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, used information from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and the National Academy of Social Insurance from 2012 – the most recent year for which the data were available – to find which events caused employees to miss six or more days of work and then ranked those causes by total workers’ compensation costs.

Below is the list of 10 leading injury causes, followed by the percentage accounted for by each, and then the total costs in billions:
1. Overexertion involving outside source (lifting, pushing, pulling, holding, carrying, throwing): 25.3%; $15.1
2. Falls on same level: 15.4%; $9.19
3. Struck by object of equipment: 8.9%; $5.3
4. Falls to lower level: 8.6%; $5.12
5. Other exertions or bodily reactions (bending, crawling, reaching, twisting, climbing, stepping, kneeling, sitting, standing, walking): 7.2%; $4.27
6. Roadway incidents involving motorized land vehicle: 5.3%; $3.18
7. Slip or trip without fall: 3.6%; $2.17
8. Caught in or compressed by equipment or objects: 3.5%; $2.1
9. Repetitive motions including micro-tasks: 3.1%; $1.84, and
10. Struck against object or equipment: 2.9%; $1.76.

It should be noted that these categories account for 83.8% because there are additional categories beyond the top 10.

The previous index from Liberty Mutual stated that the top 10 injuries in 2011 accounted for $55.4 billion a year in workers’ comp costs – making an increase of 7.55% from year to year.

Tagged in: OSHA

The National Fire Protection Association is seeking comments on a Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) to NFPA 1999. Standard on Protective Clothing for Emergency Medical Operations. According to a press release, this TIA follows work conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the World Health Organization, and other organizations and federal agencies that recognized the need for a national standard on personal protective equipment to protect emergency first responders from exposure to liquid-borne pathogens.

Read entire article - http://www.nfpa.org/press-room/news-releases/2014/nfpa-seeks-comments-to-help-protect-first-responders-from-ebola-virus

certifications

Go to top