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There were a total of 5,190 fatal work injuries recorded in the United States in 2016, representing a 7-percent increase from the 4,836 fatal injuries reported in 2015. That’s according to the most recent Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

This marked the third consecutive increase in annual workplace fatalities and the first time more than 5,000 fatalities have been recorded by the CFOI since 2008. The fatal injury rate increased to 3.6 per 100,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) workers from 3.4 in 2015, the highest rate since 2010.

Read entire article - https://www.bls.gov/news.release/cfoi.nr0.htm

CDC has deactivated its emergency response for the Zika virus and will resume normal program operations. A team of experts from across the agency, called the Zika Coordination and Operations Transition Team (ZCOTT), will lead the transition from EOC activation to routine, long-term activities and will ensure timely coordination and collaboration on scientific, communication, and policy activities.

The agency activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) on January 22, 2016 in response to the devastating effects of Zika virus infection during pregnancy.

Read entire article - https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p0929-eoc-deactivation-zika.html

 

 

 

Tagged in: CDC zika virus

Posted by on in Noise Measurement

If you’re accustomed to ignoring surveys offered through everything from sales receipts to emails to online pop-ups, here’s one it pays to lend an ear to.

Noise, or undesirable sound, is one of the most common health problems to be found in many workplaces. Practically all workplaces directly involved in manufacturing, construction, or mining create noise as a by-product. While this cannot be totally eliminated, the negative health effects of noise can be limited by wearing the proper personal protective equipment and, in some instances, implementing engineering and/or administrative controls.

Noise can also be detrimental to job performance, increase fatigue, and cause irritability. Perhaps the most widely known harmful result from exposure is noise-induced hearing loss. Such losses can be either temporary or permanent; the extent of the damage is dependent mainly upon the intensity and length of exposure.

In the early 1980s, OSHA announced a hearing conservation amendment (29 CFR 1910.95, Occupational Noise Exposure Standard) that requires hearing conservation programs for all employees exposed to noise on an eight-hour, time weighted average (TWA) in excess of 85 decibels measured on an A-weighted scale (85 dBA). The permissible exposure limit is 90 dBA for an eight-hour TWA. It’s worth noting that continued exposure to more than 85 decibels (dBA) of noise may cause gradual, but permanent, damage to hearing.

The OSHA hearing conservation program for industry has five parts. They are:
-Noise Monitoring: Sound levels must be measured to determine the degree of potential employee exposure and what safeguards may be needed.
-Hearing Testing: All employees in a hearing conservation program must be tested annually.
-Employee Training and Education: Employees in a hearing conservation program must be trained every year on hearing protection.
-Hearing Protectors: Hearing protection devices should be made available to all employees according to the noise risks identified.
-Record Keeping: A company must maintain records on sound level results, equipment calibration results, and hearing test records of employees, along with its educational activities.

Fortunately, a noise survey of a workplace environment can be used identify where high noise levels are most likely to occur, leading to a more efficient hearing conservation program.

Workplace Safety & Health Co., Inc. can provide this service, which can be used to help identify employees who need to be included in a noise control program and whether to implement engineering controls to reduce exposure. Need assistance with preliminary engineering control selection? Give us a call. We can even assist third party engineers with design guidance – telling them what is needed and let them do the design work.

As always, thanks for listening!

Tagged in: noise measurement

The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) is asking whether it should develop a new contamination control standard that identifies best practices for cleaning firefighters' PPE and how gear should be handled after possible exposure to contaminants, or, instead, add that information to the existing NFPA 1581 standard.

Read entire article - https://community.nfpa.org/community/nfpa-today/blog/2017/10/05/should-nfpa-develop-an-all-new-standard-on-ppe-contaminant-control-or-roll-the-requirements-into-nfpa-1581

 

There’s no mistaking the value in lifelong learning, but training courses – whether they last a few hours or a few days, can sometimes seem daunting to anyone enrolled in them.

A 2015 Microsoft study found that the average person’s attention span is about 8 seconds. While that finding and others like it might suggest that any productivity or safety message at work is playing to a sold-out crowd at Short Attention Span Theatre, a new trend known as microlearning seeks to capitalize on that apparent shortcoming.

As the name suggests, microlearning courses are shorter than traditional training: A single microlearning session aims to teach one particular lesson in a concentrated way – a single presentation typically ranges from 2 to 5 minutes. Such sessions are typically more convenient than traditional classroom settings, too: Most microlearning formats are easily accessed from smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers, while organizations can choose to offer courses either at specific times or an on-demand basis.

Considering the time many people spend watching video – one recent study found that many Millennials spend upwards of a total of three hours a day gazing into the electronic ether – the concept of brief, targeted lessons with clear-cut goals seems like a logical progression in eLearning.

In the few years since such courses have been offered, there is evidence to suggest that putting forth the effort can bear fruit. As chronicled in the 2016 Fortune magazine article "Corporate Training Gets an Upgrade for the Facebook Generation," Walmart developed an app for its warehouse workers comprised of three-minute instructional videos on performing common tasks safely. Each lesson was followed by a short test. Following a trial period of six-months, injury claims at the company’s warehouses fell by nearly half. The magazine also looked at a private Facebook group created by PayPal aimed at helping its employees help each other troubleshoot by watching videos of short classes. One major takeaway was that the number of workers who finished at least two training courses every six months doubled. During that same period, PayPal was able to reduce its training expenses by nearly a 25 percent.

It’s clear that such a method – taken by itself – has its limits. For example, a two-day personal protective equipment training course cannot adequately impart all its lessons in a single five-minute video, no matter how motivated the student and concise the course material. And instructor-led courses have the versatility of responding to students’ learning pace and questions in an organic way. However, when microlearning sessions are incorporated in the framework of a longer course in complementary ways, such as when some lessons are transferred to video as prerequisites for attending a brick-and-mortar course or when they are used in conjunction with one to introduce or reinforce concepts, it appears that the sky (or the Cloud) is the limit.

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