Although it might not always feel like it (particularly in the depths of mid-winter), February is the shortest month.

For many kinds of workplaces, it’s also time to post workplace injury summaries from the previous calendar year.

The U.S. Department of Labor requires companies to post Form 300A from Feb. 1 through April 30 each year. The form shows a summary of the total number of job-related injuries and illnesses that occurred over the previous year. The form also shows the annual average number of employees and total hours worked during the calendar year.

The form must be displayed in a common area where notices to employees are normally posted.

Required on the summary is the total number of work-related injuries and illnesses that occurred last year and that were recorded on OSHA Form 300, Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.

What if an organization had no recordable injuries last year, you ask? That’s always good news, but it must still be reported, simply by placing zeroes on the total lines.

Exempt from federal OSHA injury and illness posting requirements are companies with 10 or fewer employees and employers in certain industries in the retail, services, finance, insurance and real estate sectors. For more on this, visit

How can you recognize whether an injury or illness is considered work-related by OSHA? If an event or exposure in the work environment caused or contributed to the condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing condition, it’s work-related. A work environment includes the establishment and other locations where one or more employees are working or are present as a condition of their employment.

For more information on posting requirements, contact the recordkeeping coordinator at your OSHA Regional office (refer to If your workplace is in a state with its own occupational safety agency, reach out to the state plan office (visit for a directory).